Artist’s Talk – Jethro Brice @ ‘Living Flood Histories’ Conference

FUTUREMUSEUM artist Jethro Brice will give a short presentation to the final conference of the ‘Living Flood Histories‘ project, on the 16th of June, at the Guildhall Arts Centre, Gloucester .

Jethro will be speaking about the genesis of FUTUREMUSEUM and current developments in the project. The talk will present some of the conceptual and creative tools that have informed the making of the collection, and their application to a reading of Somerset and Avon as a fluid  landscape.

Arts and Humanities Research Council
Living Flood Histories network

Learning to Live: Floods and Futures

Guildhall Arts Centre, Gloucester, UK on 16th June 2011

(9.15 registration; 9.50 start; 17.00 finish)

 

This conference will draw on the spirit of interdisciplinarity and performance which has characterised the three preceding workshops (see www.glos.ac.uk/livingfloodhistories).  The event will have three overarching themes around learning to live with floods and futures – conceptual underpinnings, local knowledges and resilience.

Keynote speakers:

  • Dr John Wylie (Department of Geography, University of Exeter)
  • Dr Carrie Jo Coaplen (Department of English, Morehead University, USA)
  • Professor Hamish Fyfe (George Ewart Evans Centre for Storytelling, University of Glamorgan)

Participants will explore:

  • possible conceptual underpinnings to research/practice in this area – unsettling landscapes, watery sense of place, sustainable flood memory, heritage from below, informal knowledges, guerrilla memorialisation….
  • what arts and humanities research perspectives and creative/ performed responses on watery and flooded landscapes/ communities and their environmental change can bring to discussions around flood resilience.
  • how social learning around extreme floods/flood risk, watery sense of place, and flood heritage might draw on these innovative research perspectives to build informal flood knowledge and flood memory, and increase future community flood resilience. 

The conference will:

  • interweave three 20 minute keynotes, eleven 10 minute academic papers and practitioner inputs, performance (theatre, music, poetry), poster displays and art work. There will also be time for interdisciplinary and inter-professional discussion. 
  • integrate research explorations with an exhibition (physical and digital) of objects, artefacts, stories, images, audio-visual brought together by the network along with community arts productions (plays/displays) exploring how floods are remembered and materialised in landscapes that are habitually wet (e.g. Somerset Levels) and those that experience extreme inundation rarely (e.g. lower Severn). 
  • identify future research developments for the network and promote writing opportunities.

Who is the conference for? 

Academics, performers, artists, practitioners in flood risk management and representatives from community flood groups are encouraged to register for participation by completing the attached booking form (important!).  We will confirm your place.  There is no cost for participation but charge of £50 will normally be charged for registration if you do not appear on the day. 

Project Team

Professor Lindsey McEwen

Dr Iain Robertson (University of Gloucestershire)

Dr Owain Jones (University of West of England)

Professor Mike Wilson (University College Falmouth)

Centre for the Study of Floods and Communities

University of Gloucestershire
Francis Close Hall
Swindon Road
Cheltenham
Gloucestershire
GL50 4AZ
United Kingdom
*******************
Tele: ++44(0)1242 714675
Email: lmcewen@glos.ac.uk

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